Thursday, January 11, 2018

Street Drugs and Pregnancy: What You Need to Know

Did you know that roughly one in 20 women – or 5 percent – take street drugs during pregnancy? And, according to a recent California-based study, marijuana use among moms-to-be climbed from 4.2% to 7.1% from 2009 through 2016. 

Whether pot, cocaine, heroin or ecstasy, street drugs and pregnancy just don’t mix — and can cause devastating (even fatal) effects before, during, and after pregnancy for you and your baby-to-be. This is because many substances pass easily through the placenta, so the drugs you take during pregnancy, to some degree, reach the baby. In fact, when a baby is exposed to drugs in the womb before birth, he or she can experience severe drug withdrawal immediately or up to 14 days after birth.

Complications caused by street drugs don’t just end after childbirth. Drug addiction can also lead to mental health issues and severely impair your ability to parent. In turn, as the child grows older, his or her physical, mental and emotional development will suffer. 

Risks of Substance Abuse During Pregnancy
Many women who use street drugs may use more than one drug and also have other unhealthy behaviors, like smoking and drinking alcohol, according to the March of Dimes. This makes it a bit tricky to pinpoint exactly how each drug affects pregnancy. Still, there are plenty of adverse health effects linked to these risky behaviors, including: 
  • Infertility
  • Problems with the placenta
  • Preterm labor
  • Miscarriage
  • Stillbirth
  • Premature birth 
  • Low birth weight
  • Smaller-than-normal head size (called reduced head circumference)
  • Heart defects
  • Birth defects
  • Infections, including hepatitis C, HIV (the virus that causes AIDS) and Zika
  • Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS)
  • Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) 
Addiction Treatment for Moms-to-Be
Pregnancy is the perfect opportunity to take charge of your health and change any patterns of alcohol and/or substance use. At Rising Roads, we understand the unique challenges of women and our female staff can help you start on a healing path toward lasting sobriety. To learn more, call us today: 866-746-1558.

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