Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Health Benefits of Female Friends

The right friendships are crucial to your recovery and gender-specific addiction treatment programs provide the perfect opportunity to form lifelong friendships with other women in recovery. 

Of course, the biggest benefit is being surrounding with other women who are supportive of your recovery needs. Yet the health perks of female friends reach beyond the walls of rehab as well. Here’s why:  
  • You’ll lower your stress levels. Two stressed-out women are almost hard-wired to make each other feel better, according to studies. Women have the ability to open themselves up emotionally in ways that men can't. This helps them release their stress much more quickly and healthily.
  • You’ll boost your immunity. Women with stronger social ties tend to be healthier than those without, say researchers. One study found that those who had close friendships (especially with the same sex) had better immune systems. 
  • You’ll become more positive. Women tend to want to impress one other and this can make them try harder to put on a positive front. And acting positive can give you and others around you a mood boost. Researchers say it’s the “fake it until you make it” effect.   
  • You’ll have a stronger sense of community. Women tend to relate to other women better than they would men, so you’ll automatically gain a stronger sense of security and community – which is especially vital for those in recovery. In other words, female friendships aren’t just “nice” – they’re crucial for sober living!

Recovery Support for Women by Women
Our "sisters in recovery" are ready and willing to support you through the good, the bad, and the ugly. Without fear there can be no courage. At Rising Roads, women can be fearful, supported, and courageous at the same time. To learn more about our gender-specific rehab, call us today: 866-746-1558



Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Diabetes and Substance Use Disorder: What You Need to Know

Did you know that diabetes currently affects more than 246 million people worldwide – and more than half of these people are women? Diabetes is especially hard on women, causing difficulties during pregnancy as well as a higher risk of a heart attack, at a younger age. 

Firstly, getting help for a substance use disorder is a great first step toward safeguarding your health. Alcohol abuse can lower the body’s sensitivity to insulin, which can up your chances of developing type 2 diabetes. What’s more, too much alcohol may cause chronic inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis), which can potentially lead to diabetes.

In honor or National Diabetes Awareness month, held every November, we put together a few tips to help you prevent type 2 diabetes –  and they just happen to be good for your recovery, too. 

Stop yo-yo dieting: Each time you lose weight through dieting, you also loose muscle mass that helps you burn visceral fat and control blood sugar, Betul Hatipoglu, MD, an endocrinologist at the Cleveland Clinic, told EverydayHealth.com.

Manage stress: Long-term stress can cause long-term high blood glucose levels, notes the American Diabetes Association, who recommends the following stress busters: 
  • Start an exercise program or join a sports team.
  • Take dance lessons or join a dancing club.
  • Start a new hobby or learn a new craft.
  • Volunteer at a hospital or charity. 
Make exercise a priority. Breaking a sweat is key in lowering blood sugar, because even moderate exercise causes muscles to suck up glucose at 20 times the normal rate, notes EverydayHealth.com.

Get your vitamin D levels checked. Low levels of vitamin D have been preliminarily linked to a greater risk of type 2 diabetes. And since addiction wreaks havoc on the body’s ability to absorb essential nutrients, including vitamin D, it can’t hurt to take steps to boost those levels. In general, there are three ways to get more: sun, supplements and food.

Alcohol Abuse Treatment for Women 
Rising Roads Recovery is dedicated to helping women who are struggling with alcohol use disorder and/or a co-occurring mental disorder. Our treatment center was created to inspire women to thrive in recovery. To learn more, call today: 866-746-1558.